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A Special Collaboration

The Neustadt and The Corning Museum of Glass have partnered for a special collaboration focusing on the glass mosaic production of Louis C. Tiffany. This groundbreaking exhibition, entitled Tiffany’s Glass Mosaics, combines works from both collections with important loans and specially designed digital displays to reveal how Tiffany’s mosaics reflect an extraordinary but little-known aspect of his studio’s artistic production.

Tiffany’s Glass Mosaics

Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company (1892-1902), New York | Designed by Joseph Lauber (American, b. Germany, 1855-1948) | Panel, Fathers of the Church, 1892 | Glass mosaic with glass jewels | Exhibited at the World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago, Illinois (1893) | 97 ¾ in. by 58 ½ in. | N.86.M.01 | Photo: The Corning Museum of GlassTiffany Glass and Decorating Company (1892-1902), New York | Designed by Joseph Lauber (American, b. Germany, 1855-1948) | Panel, Fathers of the Church, 1892 | Glass mosaic with glass jewels | Exhibited at the World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago, Illinois (1893) | 97 ¾ in. by 58 ½ in. | N.86.M.01 | Photo: The Corning Museum of GlassAlthough Louis C. Tiffany is best known for his pioneering leaded glass windows and lamps, his mosaics are the culmination of his experimentation and artistry in glass. During the more than 30 years of his mosaic production, Tiffany approached mosaics with the same unbridled creativity and glass-making techniques that characterized his work in leaded and blown glass. Using a rich variety of materials, including multicolored opalescent glass and shimmering iridescent glass, accented with three-dimensional glass ‘jewels,’ Tiffany’s innovations established a bold new aesthetic for mosaics and contributed a uniquely American character to the centuries-old art form.

Organized in partnership with The Corning Museum of Glass, Tiffany’s Glass Mosaics features nearly 50 works dating from the 1890s to the 1920s, from intimately scaled mosaic fancy goods to large-scale mosaic panels composed of thousands of individual pieces of glass. Drawing on The Neustadt’s unparalleled archive of Tiffany glass, the exhibition also includes more than 1,000 original examples of colored sheet glass and glass “jewels” made for specific mosaic commissions.

The exhibition reveals the process of creating a mosaic at Tiffany’s studios—through detailed watercolor design drawings, sample panels, and examples of completed works. Visitors will gain insight into the labor-intensive processes, including the selection of individual pieces of glass, which played a vital role in the success of the final artwork.

In addition, visitors will also experience some of Louis C. Tiffany’s most important mosaic commissions still in situ through a high-definition “Mosaic Theater,” specially created using new photography by the Corning Museum of Glass. Multiple video monitors showcase stunning details of these important artworks, allowing visitors to appreciate their design, glass selection, and craftsmanship like never before.

Tiffany’s Glass Mosaics is on view at The Corning Museum of Glass May 20, 2017 through January 7, 2018.